Welcome!

Welcome to my legislative website! I am proud to serve as the State Senator from Illinois' 29th District, representing portions of the North Suburbs of Chicago in Lake and Cook Counties.

It is truly my honor to represent you in Springfield. Please do not hesitate to contact my office with questions or ways I can better serve you.

Sincerely,

Julie Morrison

SPRINGFIELD – Following more than a year of ethics violations under the dome, Gov. JB Pritzker said during Wednesday’s State of the State address one of his main priorities of the upcoming legislative session is to hold lawmakers to the highest ethical standards – a priority shared by State Senator Julie Morrison.

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“Gov. Pritzker’s call for action against the repellant actions committed by state lawmakers is a great step toward ending unethical behavior,” Morrison (D-Deerfield) said. “I applaud the governor’s desire to fight corruption, and I will work diligently with my colleagues to ensure we pass real, lasting ethics reform this legislative session.”

During the upcoming legislative session, Morrison is sponsoring Senate Bill 2506, which requires members of the General Assembly to disclose if they have conflicts of interest on measures they are taking official action on – which includes voting for a bill. If legislators do have conflicts of interest, they would be responsible for filing written statements declaring the conflict.

“It’s more important than ever for us to strive for more transparency, greater disclosure and a higher standard of conduct,” Morrison said. “This commonsense legislation will call for lawmakers to work in the best interest of the people of Illinois by reporting if they have a conflict of interest on a legislative matter they are voting on.”

Morrison is also sponsoring Senate Bill 2506 – which would create changes to the statement of economic interest form that must be completed by a number of state employees, candidates running for office and public officials. Those changes include clarifying the definition of “economic relationship” and tweaking the definition of “investment real estate.”

Senate Bill 180, also sponsored by Morrison, would prohibit members of the General Assembly from negotiating future employment with a lobbying entity during the member’s term of office, if the lobbying entity engages in lobbying the General Assembly during that time.

“Every person who serves in elected office should serve the people of Illinois – not themselves nor their wallets,” Morrison said. “I will continue to work with my fellow lawmakers and the governor to ensure we are all held to the highest ethical standards.”

Category: Features

SPRINGFIELD – State Senator Julie Morrison (D-Deerfield) applauds Illinois for becoming the second state in the country to cap out-of-pocket costs for prescription insulin at $100 a day for a 30-day supply.

“No one should have to choose between getting the medication they need to survive and putting food on their family’s table,” Senator Morrison said. “I’m pleased the governor signed this life-saving measure into law.”

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The new law caps co-payments for insulin at $100 per month for all patients, regardless of the supply they require. The cap, however, only applies to commercial insurance plans regulated by the state.

About 1.3 million adults in Illinois have diabetes – 12.5% of the state’s population – according to the Illinois Department of Public Health. On average, people with diabetes pay $475 a month on insulin, the Health Care Cost Institute reports. The high cost drives many patients to ration their insulin supply, which can result in blindness, kidney failure or death.

“Insulin is not an option for more than one million Illinois residents,” Morrison said. “It is time Illinois leads by example to hold pharmaceutical companies accountable for choosing to maximize profits at the expense of consumers’ health.”

The measure takes effect Jan. 1, 2021.

Category: Features

SPRINGFIELD – The price of EpiPens has greatly increased over the years, causing people with certain allergies to forgo purchasing the life-saving medication. State Senator Julie Morrison (D-Deerfield) strives to offset the burdensome cost by requiring insurers to cover medically necessary epinephrine injectors.

“With increases in food allergies and other serious allergic conditions, people are relying on EpiPens more than ever,” Morrison said. “Nobody with a serious allergy should go without an epinephrine injector simply because they cannot afford one.”

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Senate Bill 2457 – sponsored by Morrison – requires insurers to cover medically necessary EpiPens for all people – regardless of their age.

In 2019, Morrison passed legislation to require insurers to cover medically necessary epinephrine injectors – also known as EpiPens – for minors. However, she wants to take the law one step further by removing the age limitation.

Epinephrine injectors deliver the drug epinephrine to individuals experiencing a severe allergic reaction. Epinephrine works by narrowing blood vessels and opening lung airways, reversing the symptoms of an allergic reaction that, if left untreated, can cause death.

“This is a life-saving medicine and it shouldn’t be too expensive for those who need it,” Morrison said. “We must do everything we can to make sure people can afford medically necessary medication.”

Category: Features

SPRINGFIELD – State Senator Julie Morrison (D-Deerfield) commends Medline Industries for taking steps to decrease ethylene oxide emissions from its Waukegan plant.


“Ethylene oxide causes cancer,” Morrison said. “We took action last year to ensure the emission of this harmful substance is no longer the cause of numerous deaths across the north suburbs.”


Medline Industries temporarily closed its Waukegan-based medical device sterilization operation to install nearly $10 million in upgrades to make the plant compliant with state laws regulating ethylene oxide, the company announced Tuesday.

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Two measures co-sponsored by Sen. Morrison, both which passed in 2019, prohibit the renewal of any permits for facilities that violate federal or state standards for ethylene oxide emissions. The other puts emission limits on non-sterilization facilities that emit ethylene oxide and requires them to obtain a permit from the IEPA. That permit must include a site-specific cap on the business’ ethylene oxide emissions.


Medline said Tuesday that it has been working “around the clock” to finish the upgrade to install the emissions abatement equipment, but must close down for a few weeks to complete the final stages of testing. Late last year, Vantage Specialty Chemicals Facility in Gurnee also completed improvements necessary to bring the plant up to the state’s guidelines.


“Facilities that use the cancer-causing chemicals should be held to the highest standards,” Morrison said. “They cannot put money over people. Medline has done the right thing by temporarily shutting down its plant in order to better protect the people of Illinois.”


The improvements from both companies come a year after a study from the University of Illinois at Chicago found higher levels of ethylene oxide in the blood of people who live near the plants. Ethylene oxide was placed on a national list of carcinogens in 1985. In 2006, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency released an assessment linking ethylene oxide to breast and blood cancer. The EPA, World Health Organization and the National Toxicology Program all declared the gas cancer-causing.

Category: Features

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