Welcome!

Welcome to my legislative website! I am proud to serve as the State Senator from Illinois' 29th District, representing portions of the North Suburbs of Chicago in Lake and Cook Counties.

It is truly my honor to represent you in Springfield. Please do not hesitate to contact my office with questions or ways I can better serve you.

Sincerely,

Julie Morrison

DEERFIELD — Starting Monday, Illinois newborns will now be tested for Spinal Muscular Atrophy, a condition that leads to death if left untreated, thanks to a law passed by State Senator Julie Morrison (D-Lake Forest). 

03142019CW0410

“Medical advancements have made all the difference in treating this horrific disease that affects our youngest children,” Morrison said. “Including testing for SMA in regular newborn screenings will ensure treatment can begin immediately to prevent the disease from progressing and causing life-time harm or even death.”

Public Act 100-0864, spearheaded by Morrison in 2017, requires all newborns to be screened for spinal muscular atrophy by July 1, 2020. The Illinois Department of Public Health met the target date, and testing will begin June 29. 

SMA is the most common genetic disorder linked to infant death worldwide and affects between 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 10,000 U.S. births. It is a terminal, degenerative disease that causes severe symptoms that eventually prevent a child from walking, standing, eating, swallowing and even breathing. Most children with the genetic disorder will not live past 18 months.

Fortunately, advances in medical treatment led the FDA to approve the first treatment for SMA in December 2016. The drug is only effective, however, if given early before symptoms fully develop, making testing of paramount importance.

“I am proud Illinois is taking a lead in ensuring all children are tested for a painful disease that can now be treated,” Morrison said.

Category: Features

download 1

DEERFIELD — State Senator Julie Morrison (D-Lake Forest) released the following statement after Gov. JB Pritzker signed the Fiscal Year 21 budget, which provides more funding for DCFS:

“No state agency has gone through more turmoil over the past decade. While not every problem revolves around funding, many of the Department of Children and Family Services’ high-profile failures come from a lack of resources.

“This additional funding is necessary to boost the workforce, which would reduce caseloads for investigators and allow more attention to go toward services. More funding means the ability to hire more highly trained workers who have the determination and stability to take on one of the state’s toughest jobs.

"I will work diligently with DCFS to hold them accountable and make sure the additional funding is used appropriately for resources to best help our state's most vulnerable children.

“Children should not have to suffer — especially at a time when they are home more often in situations that could be dangerous. We must be there for them. More money for DCFS will protect our children — and that’s the best investment we can make.”

 

 

Category: Features

Friday afternoon Gov. JB Pritzker announced that schools will remain closed for the rest of the school year to contain the spread of COVID-19. Remote and e-learning will continue in place of in-person classes.

We know many Illinois families were hoping to return to their regular routines by the end of the school year. Students miss their friends and teachers, and parents are eager to watch their children graduate, go to prom, and enjoy other milestones.

But for the sake of everyone’s health and safety, it’s vital that we follow the guidance we’ve received from top health care and science experts around the world. That means continuing to stay home as much as possible.

We are taking the necessary steps to ensure our schools are prepared to handle remote learning: Illinois schools will receive $569 million in federal funding to help equip students with technology and internet access, support teachers in developing their remote instruction skills, and continue providing meals to children and communities during closures. When schools reopen, the Illinois State Board of Education (ISBE) will release recommendations to address learning loss and students’ social-emotional needs.

To help you through this difficult time, here are a few resources you may find useful:

 

Learning from Home

  

 

At-home learning presents a unique set of challenges for both students and parents. ISBE has put together a list of free resources and tips to help teachers and parents support student learning while schools are closed. For advice on keeping students engaged in education, visit www.isbe.net/keeplearning.

Families of children with disabilities may need extra support during this time. The Illinois Autism Partnership and Easterseals have developed a School Closure Toolkit to support children with autism through school closures. Other special education resources, including activity ideas and home learning packets, are available on the Easterseals website.

Finding Child Care

 

 

With schools and many daycares closed, some essential employees are worried about finding care for their children while they are at work. Find contact information for available resources in your area by searching by your county or zip code here. Essential workers in health care, human services, government, and essential infrastructure may eligible to receive child care through Illinois’ Child Care Assistance Program. Get more information and access application materials here.

 

Managing Mental Health

 

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has been challenging for many Illinoisans—being stuck at home can be harmful to anyone’s mental health, including children. If you or your child is feeling anxious, depressed, or overwhelmed during this time, there are resources available to help.

Illinois has launched a free-of-charge emotional support text line, Call4Calm, for residents experiencing stress and mental health issues related to COVID-19. To speak with a mental health professional, text “TALK” (or “HABLAR” for Spanish-language services) to 552-020. 

The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) also offers support groups and other resources for individuals who may need help dealing with a mental health condition. Call 800-950-NAMI (6264) or visit www.nami.org to find what resources your local NAMI chapter is offering during the COVID-19 crisis.

Make no mistake: The next few weeks won’t be easy. But in order to protect our friends, loved ones, and neighbors from COVID-19, we must make sacrifices.

Our state is acting with the input of top medical experts, scientists, public health researchers, and epidemiologists—based on their advice, staying home is our most powerful tool to fight the spread of this virus. We have begun to flatten the curve, but we must maintain our course to keep the infection under control and prevent our health care system from becoming overwhelmed.

If you have questions about school closures or need other assistance, my staff is working remotely to support you during this time. Give us a call at 847 945-5200 or visit, and we’ll do our best to address your concerns.

Stay healthy. Stay safe. Stay home.

Category: Features

SPRINGFIELD – For years State Senator Julie Morrison (D-Lake Forest) has demanded more money to fix the well-documented problems at the Department of Child and Family Services that have led to mistreatment of the state’s most vulnerable population. On Wednesday, Gov. J.B. Pritzker shared Morrison’s concerns, and proposed more than $100 million in additional funding for the troubled state agency.

01282020CM0177

“DCFS has experienced more turmoil in the past decade than any other state agency,” Morrison said. “While not all of the agency’s problems revolve around funding, many of the high-profile failures come from it being cash-strapped and squandering its meager resources.”

Morrison has been a constant advocate for more funding and oversight for DCFS following years of reporting issues, understaffing and mistreatment of children in the system. The nearly $147 million in additional funding proposed Wednesday would be used to boost the workforce, which would reduce caseloads for investigators and allow more attention to go toward the high demand of services.

“There is no question the agency needs more employees and resources to hire highly trained workers who have the determination and emotional stability to take on one of the toughest jobs,” Morrison said. “I applaud the governor’s commitment to help this already at-risk group of children.”

If the proposed budget passes, DCFS will receive $1.46 billion in funding, 11% more than the current budget allots for the organization.

Category: Features

COVID-19 Resources

Vote-by-mail

eNewsletter Signup

eNewsletter Signup
  1. First Name(*)
    Invalid Input
  2. Last Name(*)
    Invalid Input
  3. Your Email(*)
    Please let us know your email address.